The Very Green Gardener

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

12.00
Turmeric rhizome.JPG
Turmeric flower credit Mokkie.jpg
Turmeric in ground credit Mokkie wiki commons.jpg

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

12.00

Well! It has taken a long time to get turmeric in quantities high enough for sale. We have a very limited run, so get it while you can.

Turmeric (also known as Curcuma longa, Curcurma domestica and Haridra) is in the same family as ginger, but a spice all on its own. It has fantastic properties for healing inflammation, is vital in a lot of Indian/SE Asian cooking, and generally deserves the rabid following from health nuts everywhere. Turmeric is used often in Ayurvedic medicine under the name Haridra. I (and my chronic back pain suffering client Penny, who taught me this) put a teaspoonful of dried turmeric in my coffee every morning before gardening.

Because Turmeric is from a very hot part of the planet, it is best kept in a large pot and put under cover in winter. Ideally it would be kept between 20 and 30 degrees year round. Personally I dig it all up in Autumn and put it in pots on the windowsill until the frosts have passed in Spring, which is what I’d recommend. Turmeric loves full sun, lots of water and fertile soil.

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Well! It has taken a long time to get turmeric in quantities high enough for sale. We have a very limited run, so get it while you can.

Turmeric (also known as Curcuma longa, Curcurma domestica and Haridra) is in the same family as ginger, but a spice all on its own. It has fantastic properties for healing inflammation, is vital in a lot of Indian/SE Asian cooking, and generally deserves the rabid following from health nuts everywhere. Turmeric is used often in Ayurvedic medicine under the name Haridra. I (and my chronic back pain suffering client Penny, who taught me this) put a teaspoonful of dried turmeric in my coffee every morning before gardening.

Because Turmeric is from a very hot part of the planet, it is best kept in a large pot and put under cover in winter. Ideally it would be kept between 20 and 30 degrees year round. Personally I dig it all up in Autumn and put it in pots on the windowsill until the frosts have passed in Spring, which is what I’d recommend. Turmeric loves full sun, lots of water and fertile soil.

Turmeric is a rhizome and the top tends to die off in Winter. This turmeric is rooted and for sale year round, but outside of Spring/Summer/early Autumn, your turmeric may arrive without any leaves.

Because Turmeric is from a very hot part of the planet, it is usually imported and sprayed. This turmeric is in its third year under the organic nursery’s care but I wouldn’t class its origin as organic as we simply can’t guarantee that. It has been in organic care for as long as we’ve had it, obviously, but the tubers this turmeric came from weren’t organic.

Picture credit for the turmeric in the ground, and turmeric flower, from Mokkie (acquired via Wiki commons). We dug and split ours at the same time that we realised we had enough in saleable quantities, so we will update the pictures with our own next year.

I am not currently selling any cheapies of this plant. It has been a hard, expensive road trying to propagate it. If you are broke and in love with the idea of growing turmeric, go to a store selling fresh turmeric rhizome, buy up a load, soak it in warm water with a spot of vinegar for 24hrs, and then pot it up with a whole lot of rooting hormone. Turmeric is sprayed with growth inhibitors before its sold (another good reason to grow your own- less chemicals in your body), but if you’re patient it will eventually grow.